Posts Tagged ‘tutorial’

I recently returned from a weekend ski trip with a few friends which reminded me of something.  It can get really freaking cold sometimes.  The conditions were lovely and it was a great time, but getting back to my point, by the end of the day, the wind was picking up and the temperature at least felt like it plummeted.  This made me think about my BoB and the clothes I have packed.  I realized that I’ve packed for the spring and fall relatively well, but if I had to take off now I would probably freeze to death the first night if I couldn’t keep a good hot fire going.  If I had to bug out in the middle of the summer, I would be carrying way more clothes than I would need and not nearly enough water.  With this in mind I think I will start checking the inventory list that Sarge suggested I make, and updating whats in my BoB based on the current season.  I suppose that this would be a relatively simple concept (as I just compelted a google search and came up with multiple posts about seasonal BoBs: http://www.todayssurvival.com/forum/index.php?topic=143.0http://www.survival-homestead.com/bug-out-bag-checklist.html (this one also gives a very good checklist for a BoB)) but I didn’t think about it until this last weekend.  Good thing the nothing hit the fan.  I would suggest checking your BoB for the correct  supplies about every two to three months, or when a drastic change to your local weather occurs.  Ensure in the summer you have extra water, lightweight clothes, and sun protection of some kind or another.  In winter extra warm clothes and blankets (I suggest those space blankets that fold down to the size of a thin wallet, yet somehow can keep you really warm) and definitely some form of fire starter.  Spring and fall you need clothes that are cool enough when you’re moving about during the day, yet warm enough to keep you comfortable at night.  Again going back to my Boy Scout days, wear layers.  They can be easily shed as you warm up, and then replaced as it cools down.  It’s also a lot easier packing many thin layers of clothing rather than a few bulky layers.  They can also be removed and replaced from the BoB as necessary for season changes.  Another thing I remember from Boy Scouts is that cotton kills.  The reason they said this was that cotton can absorb an absurd amount of water, and then it takes an enormous amount of energy to remove said water.  If you are wearing this soaking or even damp cotton, guess where that energy to dry it comes from?  That’s right, you.  Wearing fabrics like wool and polypropylene will wick the moisture away from you skin, keeping your energy loss to a minimum.  They also dry more quickly as they cannot hold as much water.  So with all that in mind I suggest you go check your BoB to ensure you’re prepared for the current weather and not the weather you would prefer.

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How Prepared am I?

Posted: February 8, 2012 by boyscout556 in Preparation
Tags: , , , ,

Today I started to evaluate how prepared I am for TEOTWAWKI.  I realized I’m fucked. Although I already have a rifle and will be adding a shotgun to that in the next few days, that’s about as far as my preparedness goes.  I currently don’t have room to stockpile supplies (I rent a room from a friend and he already thinks I’m nuts because I just bought a shotgun).  I also realized I have an issue knowing when something is required, and when i just want it really badly.  Let me demonstrate:  My computer died on me over the weekend.  No big deal since I still have my netbook (hence this post).  I still felt the need to replace the computer right now rather than waiting a few weeks, to make sure I really need it.  Sitting at work today pondering my new computer purchase I realized that I have large impulsive tendencies that I have trouble controlling ( hence the reason I am now getting a new shotgun and new computer).  Now its not like I cant afford both purchases, its just that I really didnt need to make both purchases in the same week, or probably even month.  I guess this whole situation is a good thing because it shows me a glaring issue in my preparedness, which I can now address, and start being more prepared for whatever happens to come next.  The point of this whole story is to show, just because you have started to hoard supplies and have a great BoB and BoV, doesnt mean you’re really ready for TEOTWAWKI.   It just means you have more stuff.  Your mindset has to be such that you can actually survive after the SHTF.  I need to work on this big time.  You might want to attempt a self evaluation.

Think you don’t have the cash to prep? Quit making excuses and come back tomorrow for Ten Ways to Prep for Free

Get this: So I’m drinking a beer, making a list of shit I’ll need to survive and I have this moment of genius delusional paranoia in which I create this Decision Flow Chart:

I’m telling you, this MBA is PAYING FOR ITSELF!!!

Anyway.

So the basic idea here (as if you can’t read a friggin’ flow chart) is that you want to be ready for any shit that could possibly go down. The way I see it, there’s three different scenarios you could have on your hands:

Long term shelter in place: This is your stockpile. What would you need if you had to fend for yourself in your home for months or years? Food, water, ammunition, heating fuel… Basically you want to turn your house into a cold war style shelter, complete with cans of stale Saltines.

Evacuation on foot. This is where you’ll want a bug out bag (or go bag).This is a backpack loaded with supplies that you can carry with you. You should have one for each member of the family – even a three year old can carry a change of clothes or a blanket.

Evacuation in a vehicle. You’ll want prepacked boxes (or suitcases) of provisions in case it takes you a long time to get to your destination. Think Oregon Trail.

A note on vehicular evacuation:You’ll always want to supplement this with your bug out bags in case you’re forced to abandon your vehicle and hoof it.

You’ve also gotta consider the exacerbating circumstances you could encounter. Does your survival stockpile account for the fact that you may not have power for cooking? Are you equipped to defend your family from looters during an evacuation?  Do you have the supplies and training you would need to administer first aid?
Sam Adams may have helped me write this post, but I maintain that the advice is valid.